Consumer Information


Student Right to Know:

The Student Right to Know Act requires an institution that participates in any student financial assistance program under Title IV of Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) to disclose information about graduation rates to current and prospective students . The Higher Education Act of 1992 required that these same institutions report this data to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) through completion of the IPEDS graduation rate survey. Information about Davis Tech (including student body diversity, completion, retention, graduation and financial aid performance rates) can be easily accessed through College Navigator, which is a service provided by the National Center for Education Statistics.

The Davis Technical College does not participate in any NCAA athletic programs and offers no athletically-related financial aid.

Information on placement rates can be located on individual program pages.

Perkins

Perkins Continuous Improvement Plan 2017
Perkins Continuous Improvement Plan 2018
Perkins Local FAUPL
Perkins Performance Report

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) sets limits on the disclosure of personally identifiable information from school records, and defines the rights of the student to review the records and request a change to the records. For more information you may refer to FERPA for Students and the Davis Tech Student Records Policy.

Campus Health and Safety Policy

Health and safety at the Davis Technical College (Davis Tech) is undertaken in accordance with relevant institutional, industrial, governmental agency regulations and policies and procedures contained in the Campus Health and Safety Plan. This policy is intended to promote a safe, secure, healthful learning and work environment.

Crime Report:

In this annual report, Davis Tech provides information regarding the frequency of crimes committed on its campuses and policies and procedures designed to combat crime and strengthen security for the three most recent calendar years. The report includes current policies and procedures for students and employees to report a crime, a list of the titles of those to whom a crime is reported, the College’s relationship with local and state police agencies, a statement of the drug and alcohol policies, the type and frequency of programs designed to provide information on campus security procedures and policies, information on crime prevention and on sexual assault programs and support and procedures regarding sexual assaults.

This report complies with the requirements of the “Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.” This information is published yearly by October 15. Paper reports are available upon request from the Davis Tech office of Security.

The Davis Technical College is among the safest campus in the nation. The community oriented approach to campus safety and security has been a trademark of this institution for the last twenty years. "Everyone is a member of the Campus Safety Team" .... Brent Petersen, V.P. of Operations. Everyone has a responsibility for campus safety and security by; reporting, complying and participating. Campus security is comprised of a layered security infrastructure and several volunteer response teams including; the Emergency Operations Team, Crisis Intervention Team, Evacuation Team, Threat Assessment Team and Safety Committee. The Campus Crime Report is published each year in August.

The Campus Security Act of 1990 requires a school to compile and distribute an annual campus security report detailing the number and types of crimes committed on each Title IV eligible campus. In this annual report, Davis Tech provides information regarding the frequency of crimes committed on its campuses and policies and procedures designed to combat crime and strengthen security for the three most recent calendar years. The report includes current policies and procedures for students and employees to report a crime, a list of the titles of those to whom a crime is reported, the College’s relationship with local and state police agencies, a statement of the drug and alcohol policies, the type and frequency of programs designed to provide information on campus security procedures and policies, information on crime prevention and on sexual assault programs and support and procedures regarding sexual assaults. This report complies with the requirements of the “Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.” This information is published yearly by October 15. Paper reports are available upon request from the Davis Tech office of Security.

Peer to Peer File Sharing:

It is illegal to reproduce and distribute copyrighted music, movies, television shows, books, articles, pictures, software and other copyrighted materials specifically through the use of peer-to-peer (P2P) networks. This information describes the practice, infringement and penalties of violating U.S. Copyright Laws through the use of peer-to-peer file sharing.

Davis Tech Alcohol and Other Drug Policies and Procedures

The Davis Technical College is committed to preventing alcohol and other drug abuse on campus. Abuse, misuse, possession, manufacture or distribution of alcoholic beverages or other drugs is expressly forbidden on campus.

It is the intent of these policies and procedures:

  • To create an environment that will be free from alcohol and other drug abuse.
  • To foster an attitude on the part of the campus members that discourages the inappropriate use of alcohol and other drugs.
  • To promote healthy lifestyles for all members of the campus community.
  • To educate all members of the campus community, including faculty, staff and students regarding the negative consequences resulting from the use and/or misuse of alcohol and other drugs.
  • To encourage alcohol and other drug-free activities within the campus community.
  • To create a more productive student body through awareness and education which will allow for positive and personal growth.

Institutional Sanctions
Sanctions for employees which may be imposed by the institution include, but are not limited to the following: oral reprimand or warning, written reprimand or warning, required or recommended counseling or rehabilitation, termination and referral for prosecution. For more detailed information on staff sanctions and procedures, see the Drug and Alcohol-Free Workplace; Drug and Alcohol Testing Policy available through the Human Resources office.

Sanctions for students which may be imposed by the institution may include disciplinary action up to and including expulsion from school and referral for prosecution. For additional information on student sanctions and procedures, see the Student Code of Conduct.

The Risks Involved
Types of DrugsHealth Risks Federal Laws Utah Laws to Possess Utah Laws to Possess with Intent
Schedule I: Narcotics, such as heroin; hallucinogens such as LSD, mescaline and peyote. Psychologically and physically addictive; depression, withdrawal symptoms, convulsions, unpredictable behavior with hallucinogens; possible damage to unborn fetus. Minimum penalty: low end amount (size depends on drug) – 5-40 years High end amount – 10 years to life. Maximum fine: $2-4,000,000. If death or serious injury occurs – 20 years to life. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid. Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony).From 1-15 years and/or up to $10,000 fine (second degree felony).
SCHEDULE II: Narcotics, such as opium, morphine, methadone and codeine; depressants, such as methaqualone (quaalude) and some barbiturates; stimulants, such as cocaine and some amphetamines; and phencyclidine (PCP), a hallucinogen. Psychologically and physically addictive; depression, withdrawal symptoms, convulsion, respiratory failure, frequent accidents; possible damage to unborn fetus; cocaine and amphetamines increase blood pressure which can lead to irregular heart beat and death; amphetamines can cause agitation; increase in body temperature, hallucination, convulsions and possible death. Minimum penalty: low end amount (size depends on drug) – 5-40 years. High end amount – 10 years to life. Maximum fine: $2-4,000,000. If death or serious injury occurs – 20 years to life. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid. Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony). From 1-15 years and/or up to $10,000 fine (second degree felony).
SCHEDULE III: Stimulants (including some amphetamines); depressants (including some barbiturates); and some narcotics. Psychologically and physically addictive; drowsiness, withdrawal symptoms, abdominal and muscle cramps, anxiety, tremors, insomnia, convulsion, possible death, possible damage to unborn fetus. All drugs, any amount. Maximum: three years/$250,000. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid.Up to six months and/or up to $1,000 fine (Class B misdemeanor). Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony).
SCHEDULE IV: Depressants, including the benzodiazepines (e.g., valium, librium and dalmane), choral hydrate, some barbiturates and others (e.g., opium, codeine) than drugs included in schedules I-IV. Psychologically and physically addictive; drowsiness, withdrawal symptoms, abdominal and muscle cramps, anxiety, tremors, insomnia, convulsion, possible death, possible damage to unborn fetus. All drugs, any amount. Maximum: three years/$250,000. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid.Up to six months and/or up to $1,000 fine (Class B misdemeanor). Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony).
SCHEDULE V: Chemical compounds with smaller quantities of certain drugs, included in schedules I-IV. Psychologically and physically addictive; nausea, gastrointestinal symptoms, drowsiness, withdrawal symptoms including runny nose, watery eyes, panic, chills, cramps, irritability, nausea and possible damage to unborn fetus. All drugs, any amount. Maximum: three years/$250,000. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid.Up to six months and/or up to $1,000 fine (Class B misdemeanor). Up to one year and/or up to five years and/or $2,500 fine (class A misdemeanor).
Marijuana: Marijuana, THC, hashish, hash oil, tetrahydrocannabinol. Psychologically and physically addictive; increased risk of lung cancer, bronchitis and emphysema, contributes to heart disease, fatigue, paranoia, possible psychosis; withdrawal symptoms including insomnia, hyperactivity and decreased appetite; depression of the immune system, decreased sperm count in men and irregular ovulation in women, possible sperm and ovum damage. Under 50-kg – Max: 20 years / $1,000,000 100 - 1,000-kg – Max: 5 years / $42,000,000 Over 1,000-kg – Min:? years-life / $4,000,000 Hashish oil under 100-kg penalties are more severe from like quantities of Marijuana. Students convicted of drug offenses may also lose or become ineligible for financial aid. Under 1 oz: Up to six months and/or up to $1,000 fine (Class B misdemeanor). 1-16 oz: Up to one year and/or up to five years and/or $2,500 fine (Class A misdemeanor). 16 oz. or more: Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony). From 1-15 years and/or up to $10,000 fine (second degree felony).
Alcohol: Beer, wine, distilled spirits. May be psychologically and physically addictive. Obvious effects represent the body’s reaction to the poisoning effects of alcohol, and hangover. Can cause vitamin deficiencies, stomach problems, infection, skin problems, sexual impotence, liver damage, disorders of the heart and blood vessels, pneumonia, cancer of the lungs, throat and mouth; accidents and suicides. Drinking while pregnant increases risks of damage to the fetus. Withdrawal from long-term use without medical supervision can be fatal. Alcohol may only be used by those 21 years of age or older. Minors may not buy, possess or drink alcohol, nor lie about their age, nor have someone else lie about their age to obtain alcohol (class B misdemeanor). No one may purchase an alcoholic beverage or product if under the influence of alcohol or other drugs (class B misdemeanor). Selling or otherwise furnishing or supplying alcohol to a minor is a class A misdemeanor. Up to five years and/or up to $5,000 fine (third degree felony).

Additional Utah Laws
Obtaining or distributing under false pretenses: Maximum penalty five years imprisonment +/or $25,000 fine (felony). Paraphernalia: use, possession or sale of drug-related paraphernalia. Maximum penalty: five years imprisonment +/or $5,000 fine (felony).* *Under some circumstances is classified as a misdemeanor. Inhalants: sale or use of psychotropic chemicals (glue, paint, etc.) to get high. Maximum penalty: six months imprisonment and/or $1,000 fine (misdemeanor). Penalties are based on type of drug and quantity involved in the violation. Penalties increase if death or injury occurs as a result of a violation and/or previous offenses have occurred. For more detailed information, contact the Alcohol and Other Drug Education Center on campus (613-5377). Utah laws are not based on the amount of the drug with the exception of marijuana. Penalties for illicit drug use are governed by federal laws and penalties and the State of Utah will enforce them to their fullest extent as provided by federal law. Prohibited acts occurring in public or private school-related sites or with a minor: punished one degree more than regular maximum penalty. Dram Shop Liability: You may be held responsible for damages as a result of alcohol you served even though you did not directly cause the injury. Intoxication as a Defense: Generally you cannot claim innocence because you were under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. DUI: It is illegal to be in physical control of a motor vehicle while under the influence of alcohol or other drugs. Not a Drop: A person under the age of 21 may not operate a vehicle with any measurable amount of alcohol in his/her system. Open container: It is illegal to have an open container of alcohol in a motor vehicle except in areas not accessible to the driver and passenger. Property: Used in connection with a controlled substance violation may be confiscated.

For detailed information on the effects of various types of alcohol and drugs on health and wellness, please refer to the following web site: NIDA

All reported drug and alcohol related incidents reported on campus are reviewed by the Safety Committee at its quarterly meetings. Response plans are formulated and executed as necessary.

Thank you to CEU for originating the information on the page.

Student Consumer Complaints

Students who have complaints against the college relating to fraud, false advertising, or other deceptive practices can file a complaint with the Utah Division of Consumer Protection, 160 East 300 East, 2nd Floor, Salt Lake City, UT 84111, Telephone No. 801-530-6601, Toll Free in Utah at 1-800-721-SAFE or online at www.dcp.utah.gov/complaints/index.html. In addition, students involved with distance and correspondence education can file a complaint with their state’s enforcement authority.

Students who have complaints relating to issues that are covered by the Student Code of Conduct should follow the college’s process for filing a grievance. The Student Code of Conduct is found here and the Student Grievance Policy and Procedures are found here.

Students who have complaints relating to the college’s quality of education or other issues appropriate for its accrediting body to consider, can file a complaint with the Council on Occupational Education at http://www.council.org/.

Copies of documents describing the college/university’s accreditation and state approval are available for review upon request.

Ethics Hotline

The Utah System of Technical Colleges recognizes its obligation to its students, faculty, staff, and friends to maintain the highest ethical standards in its operations. To help meet this goal, UCAT has established this confidential reporting mechanism, the UCAT Ethics Hotline. Via the Hotline, you can alert us to activities that may involve criminal, unethical, or otherwise inappropriate behavior in violation of UCAT policies or the public's trust.

We encourage your appropriate use of the Hotline. The UCAT Ethics Hotline is hosted by a private contractor, EthicsPoint. EthicsPoint will not divulge the identity of a hotline reporter without the reporter's consent. Access the UCAT Ethics Hotline.

Consumer Information